• Preceding the Battle of Bull Run by 11 days, the Battle of Carthage, fought on July 5, 1861, was one of the earliest engagements in the Civil War.

  • Once called "the largest and best arranged dwelling house west of St. Louis," Oliver Anderson's mansion is best known for the three bloody days in 1861 when it was a fiercely contested prize in a Civil War battle.

  • The tour is comprised of more than 20 stops that feature the Wornall House, Forest Hill Cemetery, the Battle of Westport Visitor Center, Big Blue Battlefield and Byram's Ford.

  • There are hundreds of people connected to the Civil War buried at Bellefontaine Cemetery. The cemetery offers visitors an easy to use map with the locations of 31 persons of Civil War notoriety.

  • Calvary Cemetery was established in 1854 and contains the graves of many persons of Civil War notoriety, including Dred Scott and Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman.

  • The Civil War may have ended in 1865, but vivid memories of the "Lost Cause" lived on for decades at the Confederate Soldiers Home of Missouri.

  • Today, the Arcadia Valley in Iron County is a peaceful setting in one of Missouri's most scenic areas. But in 1864, the valley was the scene of one of the largest and most hard-fought battles waged on the state's soil - the Battle of Pilot Knob.

  • Stephan W. Kearny, Zachary Taylor, Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, U.S. Grant, William T. Sherman and Philip Sheridan were a few of the famous Americans to serve at Jefferson Barracks.

  • This National Cemetery contains the graves of thousands of Union and Confederate soldiers, including more than 10,000 originally buried at other locations.

  • St. Louis' Old Courthouse is the site of the first two Dred Scott trials and associated with the phenomenon known as the "Underground Railroad". 

  • Ulysses S. Grant is known as the victorious Civil War general who saved the Union and became the 18th president of the United States. But he was a second lieutenant when he was assigned to St. Louis in 1843 and was smitten by Julia Dent.

  • In August 1861, Union commander Nathaniel Lyon finally caught up with Confederate troops under the command of General Sterling Price in Springfield, Missouri.